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New subheading! Lore.

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Making rubbish clothes nice-some thoughts.

Here's something I noticed recently.   Clothing shops and cosmetic, no-stat items in general suck. They're terrible! They're either expensive and useless, or cheap and useless.   It's not because they all look bad. You've obviously got a range of ideas, from fremmenik shirts (eh...) to ceremonial robes (ooh...eh). It's actually because instead of having something useful, you're stuck with something that has no stats and is no use, and you can't put anything on top.   Many of the member's loyalty programme outfits look amazing! I still won't buy them, though, because...if I want to use the full set, I have to sacrifice a headband, a top if I need to wear one, legs, boots, and so on. I won't wear them, and I won't buy them, because to look good they take up slots and...well, that's sort of it. They just take up lots of space, they feel like you're wearing armour, but you aren't.   Poor beef, but here's a sweet solution: what if every clothing shop was a clothing shop? Like Thessalia's. You go to a shop, they sell clothes, capes, hats, boots, whatever. You can go into an interface and select the clothes you want to wear by default from there! I can go to Yrsa, and decide to wear fremmenik shirts, gloves, capes automatically! I can go to that place in Canifis, and have a teal hat by default! I can go to Xuan, and wear Saxon clothing when I'm not wearing anything else!   I like that idea, but I'm not sure I can explain why I like that idea so much. In any case, I think it would mean that I would (almost always) be wearing unusual clothing, not Thessalia's standard, and that would be a good thing. You'd go to unusual places to get fancy new default gear.   What do you think, people?   ~Helm Lardar~

Helm Lardar

Helm Lardar

 

His name is James Bond

Language warning.   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aT8lJEgEuTk     ~Helm~   P.S. I got all the achievements on Learn to Fly 2, a flash game which is the sequel to "Learn to Fly". During the game, you use a penguin and a penguin dummy to variously fly really fast and destroy various obstacles, such as a snowman, a small mountain, a small iceberg, and "the wall", the biggest iceberg in the world.  

Helm Lardar

Helm Lardar

 

An oxen sturdy.

Yesterday I was bored. It wasn't that I didn't have anything to do, more that anything I had to do didn't seem to be particularly interesting, so I was browsing reddit, Sal's forums, and playing minecraft. My minecraft house is a pretty ugly fortification type thing, which I'm not sure I'm happy with but I don't want to keep building.   Anyway, part of this was that I decided to further my education I'd research something on wikipedia. So I typed in 'cow'. All manner of interesting things popped up: firstly, that their true name is cattle and that other livestock are not cattle, secondly, some of the many different breeds, including the Nazi-bred 'Heck Cattle', and attempt to resurrect the Aurochs that have been extinct since 1627 (it's an agile cattle that made 'challenging' hunting), and the modern day attempt to do that a lot better nowadays with the Netherland's Taurus project.   Other interesting facts included cow urine's role in Indian medicine, why Jersey cows are brown, and that there's some african cattle with incredibly wide and cool horns. Also that the wind cave buffalo herd is the only one not susceptible to some particular disease, and a whole bunch of other stuff about cows through the ages that interested and intrigued me: did you know, for example, that a large part of the Jersey isle's economy is the trade of Jersey Cow semen as well as milk?   One thing that particularly interested me was the article on Oxen: they're trained, crucially, to respond to vocal commands, are strong, patient, surefooted beasts, the yoke used by them meant that they were more effective than draft horses until the horse collar was made (it used their strength better). What particularly struck me was this picture:     Now apparently, riding an ox isn't that hard and never used to be that unusual. Oxen are slower and less tall than horses, but crucially they're more sure-footed and decidedly less flighty: they stick around and get the job done.   People often asks for horses in minecraft, and sometimes controllable pigs, and I suggested donkeys: but here's a much better, more quirky, and more consolidatory idea: why don't we ride oxen? This could be part of a large update involving minecraft's least appreciated beast, the cow.   Now, in minecraft cows are a bit weird: they produce milk, and they produce beef, and they produce leather, and you can breed them, but they aren't that popular. What if we put them into herds where we had female cattle that could produce milk and children, and male cattle that could produce beef, and that could be ridden? (Both produce leather when they die) You'd need to tame them with a bit of grain, you'd need to saddle them, and you'd need to make a set of reins, but once you've done that, you'd be set!   What do you think, readers?   ~Helm Lardar~

Helm Lardar

Helm Lardar

 

Answering Movario

A frivolous question, you might think, first written by the famed khazard treasure hunter and scholar Movario in his research notes while pursuing the Stone of Jas. Is it necessary to ask? No. Is it interesting to ask? Yes.   You see, to ask this question about Guthix asks a profound question about the nature of his godhood, his powers, and his self-proclaimed laws. It's something I'll try to answer now.   The first and perhaps most obvious place to start is by looking at Guthix himself: is he powerful enough to do so? Well, let's look at some of his powers: firstly, he is a shapeshifter, able to shift between such variances as a humanoid, a flying metal skull, and a butterfly. He's also skilled in magic, opening portals between many realms to allow species such as humans, dwarves, and elves in through different world gates. Third, he's able to twist both land and living to his will, creating his guardians, which have taken much more powerful forms than they originally had and are significant enemies to face. He's also shaped the land, according to Juna, and made Jas' bare and empty plane a liveable and loveable place.   However, we can be sure that Guthix has his limitations. He is not shown conclusively to have created much life but instead to have altered it: in common with most gielinorian gods, his strength seems to come from altering the flow of energy rather than creating or destroying it. One might argue that the creation of life is just that, but it seems to be something that is impossible for most gods. Guthix is not most gods: most people think he is the most powerful, powerful beyond all measure, but it seems that this may not be the case. In one of the most interesting stories of lore in the game, the Ghostly Robes miniquest has Viggora describing Zaros thus:   "The Empty Lord was a powerful god, stronger than any of the others awake at the time, possibly even as strong as Guthix is, and Zamorak was but a mortal."   (As a side note, many make an innacurate claim that Lucien is practically a god towards the end of While Guthix Sleeps. This is not the case, as even Zamorak after obtaining the same artefacts as Lucien did not gain true power until he had defeated Zaros and obtained some of his power).   Now, Zaros was not known for being the most powerful being in the known universe, unlike Guthix, and yet it seems that beforehand, they were regarded as the same. Zaros was extremely powerful, hints of which can be found in his curses and magicks given to the majharrat, and yet we do not think of him in Guthixian terms: that may be the result of the God Wars more than anything else.   I digress, Guthix was still extremely powerful as a shape-changer and Zaros at this time had invested much of his power in his Majharrat servants, which served to his disadvantage fighting Zamorak. As a result, it is possible that Viggora means his sum power was equal to Guthix: much like a total wealth where some of it is stored in items, not all the power is immediately accessible.   Guthix was also augmented with the Stone of Jas, an object that would augment the powers of any god. Perhaps Guthix used this for more than merely creating runestones, also using it to shape the world. Now, consider the lips of Guthix, and we can see that perhaps without artefacts Guthix may not be so strong.   Does Guthix have the power to drink the oceans dry? Possibly, possibly not.     To answer this question properly, we need to look at more than just his power. Would Guthix have the will to drink the oceans dry?   Well, Guthix is the protector of balance. He is sworn to not change the world and preserve life as much as possible in order to keep tension in Gielinor, and he will not break his vow except for one reason: the violation of the edicts of guthix and his subsequent awakening by his followers, in which case Guthix would remake the world as it has never been before.   Is this plausible? It's hinted in the Darkness of Hallowvale that King Roald leading an army to fight the Vampyres would be a violation of these edicts, but in my opinion that is false: Aeonsig Rasipher has several reasons for not wanting a war with Morytania and so does King Roald: expense, difficulty, risk of loss of life, potential abandoment by other nations, weakness to other dangerous forces, and the fact that the river salve works as a fairly effective barrier to prevent a morytanian invasion on a large scale despite the odd foul creature crossing every now and again. While there is treasure to be found (notably the Salve's holy crystals and the wealth of the vampyres) these disadvantages probably outweigh them until a shift in the political salvation. However, King Roald cannot be seen to refuse humanitarian aid and so the edicts provide a helpful cover.   Why do I say that the edicts won't affect it? Well, the edicts primarily concern the gods interacting with Gielinor, and say very little about actual warfare. While a Morytanian war would result in much death, it wouldn't necessarily change the balance of things much: the individual power of the vampyres and werewolves would probably result in a rough stalemate, and crucially it wouldn't result in much more power for any particular god: the Vampyres have long since abandoned Zamorak since his banishment, and the Kingdom of Misthalin is to corrupt and weak to truly instil Saradomin's might in Morytania.   As a result, I can't see anything dramatic happening that will cause the edicts to be activated in the next few thousand years. Even the return of Zaros is talked of by Juna as something to restore balance, and something that will also combat any possible return of Zamorak under the Dark Elves, the Gnomes, the Chaos Dwarves or the Majharrat, many of whom might choose to join Zaros anyway especially given he has retained a complement of his most powerful followers   Would Guthix have a reason to drink the oceans dry anytime soon? Probably not.   The final question to ask ourselves is of the oceans themselves: how big are they, and what could Guthix do with the water?   The oceans are vast and surround gielinor completely. Even taking into account the idea that we have more than one sea, simply the ring of water surrounding our large continents prevents any idea of the scale being small. The oceans are deep enough to hold rocktails, cavefish, manta rays, sharks, sea turtles and other unusual specimens that would find coexistence difficult: as a result, it is clearly large enough to support different variants of life comfortably without them intruding on each other. The existence of particularly deep fish, ie rocktails and cavefish, also hints that there would be particularly tough chasms.   To drink implies that Guthix would not be allowed to simply displace the water into another realm, something that would probably be possible for him. As a result, it seems clear that Guthix would need a kind of stomach to place the water in. While the largest vision of his floating metal skull is certainly large and it appears to be his greatest form, it seems unlikely that even a metal skull a kilometre wide could have a stomach of appropriate size to host such oceans while remaining consistent anatomically.   Are the oceans small enough to drink dry? Unlikely.   "I wonder if Guthix's lips could drink the oceans dry? Foolish thoughts - on to research." In conclusion, Movario is correct: the idea of Guthix's lips drinking the oceans dry is foolish. Guthix would be unable to for three reasons: firstly, that his power is far more suited to displacing or changing water than removing it altogether, and it is unclear whether Jas' plane had water already in it: secondly, that it would be outside of his nature as guardian of balance to do so when no serious violation of his edicts is to occur soon, and finally that the depth and breadth of the oceans shows them to be unassailable for even the largest imaginable form of Guthix that is consistent with current lore.   ~Helm Lardar~

Helm Lardar

Helm Lardar

 

:maximum strength:

Probably the coolest possible way to get max cape. Seriously. There aren't many cool ways to play runescape, but this is one of them:     ~Helm Lardar~

Helm Lardar

Helm Lardar

 

The long stainless arm of the law: an IRL story

Today, I threw a spoon at someone after a meal. He got very annoyed.   I'm 17, and so was the guy I threw it at. He was bored. After the meal, he started throwing small amounts of water at me across the table. It was annoying, it was childish, but I did my best to try not to be bothered. It was right across the table: we were at school and there were 10 of us on the table, so he was annoying the guy next to me and attracting the humour of a few others. He doesn't normally act this irritatingly, but it's a recent habit he's started to enjoy: chucking water at me.   In retaliation, I picked up a spoon and on the third time looked him in the eye and motioned as if to throw it as he started motioning that he'd chuck water at me again. Just a small amount of water, 4 or 5 millimetres in a glass. I did so after the 4th time. 5th time. He stopped throwing water. I assumed he'd go the message. He found a large wet ball of napkin. He threw that at my chest, knowing I was already frustrated and keen to throw something back at him. As warned, I threw a spoon towards him.   I'd been thinking about this action for a few minutes. Is it safe? Well, yes, my 'friend' has quick reactions and is capable of defending himself. I'm not that innacurate (it's a spoon, with nice weighting and a twirling motion in flight that keeps it going towards the centre and no left or right), so I shouldn't hit anyone else. His eyes will be safe, because I'll go for his chest: spoons don't really have sharp edges except the palm end so he's got a good chance of not being injured. Is he prepared? Well, he knows I'm tempted to throw the thing and he can see I'm getting more and more irritated gradually as he throws things. Does he deserve it? Yes, he's acting like a child and I'm not exactly putting full force in the spoon so it's a pretty mild thing. Will it hit him? Probably, I imagine he'll put his arms up.   The throws a wet napkin and hits my chest, I throw a spoon at him. It's going at a medium speed and he ducks surprisingly low: it sails over him (would have hit him in the neck, I reckon, if he'd stayed still) and it goes through between the shelves of a serving trolley. Only a few people notice it was me, and no adults: a few people think I threw a knife initially, which surprises me because they actually have fairly good eyesight and should know I've been holding a spoon for the last 10 minutes.   Everybody laughs: I don't think anyone expected me to do anything so violent and sudden as throw a spoon but the guy I'm throwing it at should have been prepared. He was, in fact, looking at me as I threw it and his duck shows me he was never in any real danger.   But he gets really annoyed. "You're an idiot! I could have gone blind! If that had hit me in the eye! Why didn't you throw an apple? It could have hit one of the staff!"   Really? You're being childish and annoying enough to deserve it. You've got good reactions, you ducked. If you hadn't ducked you'd have put your arms up. It went slightly higher than I expected, but the staff weren't in any danger: they were too far to the right and my spoon did not show any signs of deviation from those aspects. If it had hit your eye, it was travelling at a medium velocity unlikely to hurt you as you flinched and twisted your head around: you were looking at me when I threw it. I didn't throw an apple because there was no way I could reach one: you were not in any danger and it served as a reminder of how your actions merited justice in the form of an airborne peice of metal, part chrome part steel, moving at a medium pace through the air with little risk of even mild harm.   What do you guys think? Was it okay? Was it bizarre? Was it a suitable form of justice? All of the above is true and is an account of exactly how I saw my actions that day. Why does it matter that I threw the spoon? Why doesn't it matter that he threw water and a napkin the size and weight of an apple at my chest?   ~Helm Lardar~   P.S. The Calendar looks nice. What about an events feature, where people can post events they're hosting and official events are also on there? That could be, along with a lore section, another thing that Sal's could do with to make it unique.

Helm Lardar

Helm Lardar

 

Reform on the Anvil pt IV

The smithing skill involves the melting down of ore and coal into metal bars and then creating weapons, tools, and armour. These are used to protect the adventurer, help him fight, and help him perform other skill related tasks. Smithing has a consistent level up table to 99 and is therefore arguably one of the most complete skills. In addition to its normal armour creation and bar creation functions, smithing also allows the adventurer to pay an NPC less to repair the adventurer's high level armour.     Unfortunately, smithing is one of the least useful skills in the game. Although it has received its fair share of content over the years, including minigames such as the Blast Furnace and training areas such as the Artisan's Workshop it fails to deliver any reward other than a higher level in the skill itself. Smithing's core activity, the creation of objects, normally loses money, and as this is the main method of training smithing it means that the skill is not as profitable as it would be in the real world.   Although smithing has been integrated into several diaries and quests, requiring the adventurer to train it for reasons outside its own merits, this does not change its useless position: every skill requires some training in order to unlock the best diary rewards: for example, the most useless skill, firemaking, must be trained to 75 to gain an enhanced excalibur, a sword that is useful for everyday free rechargeable healing and therefore has an important role to play in questing, the slayer skill, and combat as a whole.   Many ideas have been suggested to 'fix' smithing, many on this blog, but in truth training smithing is not an issue: it is fairly simple and practical to train, and while this training may be expensive it is the lack of any reward for training the skill that makes it unfulfiling, not the cost itself.   There are several possible high level rewards: new and extra additions to armour, sharper weapons, or even combinations of the two: what about a shield that rebounds damage, for example, or a sword weighted to defend as much as attack?   The truth, however, is that Jagex implemented the perfect high level updates for smithing months ago and simply failed to pick up on their missed opportunity.   As pointed out at the beginning, smithing is the production of metal and the use of it to provide adventuring gear. But what about the repair of items? That clearly has a role in smithing, and it's one that thus far has been taken care of by allowing players a slight discount on a weird money sink.   Let's clarify that last sentence: to repair degrading armour, players take the failed armour peice to an NPC or a stand in their house and pay a certain number of coins to have this thing repaired. Some coins are discounted for a high smithing level, but this in no way manages to compensate for the expense of a high smithing level that would actually make a difference unless that same gear is going to be repaired far more times than actually happens.   Let's go back to when smithing should have recieved an update it deserved. Almost 7 years ago, the Barrows were released. With them came a new tier of level 70 armour and weapons, the best runescape had ever seen. These offered unparalleled defensive and offensive capability that has only recently begun to be challenged in many categories, so to balance it Jagex implemented a repair mechanism: barrows armour would degrade and would necessitate a little money spent in a shop every now and then.   Almost 2 years ago now, Dungeoneering was released. One of the higher level rewards for training the skill (hey, this skill has rewards for training it!) was a new set of level 80 shields and weapons. They were made of a strange new metal, nicknamed 'chaotic' and degraded: they have to be recharged at a shop run by an NPC.   1 Year ago, the nex section of the God Wars Dungeon was released. Players could gain a new set of excellent armour: Torva, Pernix, and Virtus were the best armours ever known. They degraded, and had to be recharged with coins at an NPC or one's house.   Why, Jagex? Why? What possible relation do coins have to an armour stand? Why does that thing want them? How is bob more skilled at smithing than a level 85 smith? What does tindal merchant do that makes him so marvellous at repairing wondrous 2nd age armour that hasn't been seen for millenia? Can he even smith rune? Isn't his job simply buying rusty swords and cleaning them?   The most obvious possible use for a high smithing level would be to make it necessary to repair special, degradeable armours that were unusually powerful. As a result, at a high attack and defence level, you would need to get your smithing up too. Not so much that it's pointless, as happened initially (nobody smiths rune to wear it as an armour) but at the appropriate level for other skills: level 70 smithing for barrows, level 80 for chaotic, level 85 for nex.   Let's briefly outline how it works using the concept of a torva platebody. I own a torva platebody, the finest chestplate in game, and notice that it has degraded. After entering the zaros section of the god wars dungeon, I buy some enchanted metal and cloth from Ashuelot Reis, an NPC there who might have a stockpile (remember, Jagex still needs a money sink: of course the special materials would be tradeable on the GE and indeed stockpilable). I then take these materials and the platebody to a smithy. I then use the armour and the materials on an anvil to create a fully repaired platebody.   That's how it should work with all armour repairing. You buy material, you smith it yourself, you need a smithing level. This would be applied to future updates as well: for example, when Jagex release a level 90 or 95 set of armour and weapons they will make those require smithing to repair too.   Now, despite this advantage of actually making smithing worthwhile (you can still trade in uncharged variants if you don't have the level, remember), some people would think of this as a bit of a shock. But what else are you going to add to the smithing skill that won't be utterly contrived, and why should you spit at the perfect content for high level smithing when the change is there to be made.   Initially, some people would not have the right smithing level to maintain their armour. The barrows people would suck it up and trade armour on the ge for recharging in the short term, while getting better smithing so that they can do it conveniently. The higher levels would know how to train a skill, suck it up, and do it: 80 smithing is not unreachable, after all.   Finally: "but then chaotics as a dunge reward will be pointless! they require smithing now too!". Well, they always required attack. Good armour always required defence. As a result, being able to take care of your equipment should (naturally) require a good smithing level.   ~Helm Lardar~

Helm Lardar

Helm Lardar

 

More On Lores And Guides.

When can I reasonably expect "Zaros: a guide" might be read to see if it's worthy of being accepted?   Bandos guide is going interestingly. I didn't realise there was a full history of the Dorgeshuun people after leaving Bandos available, but it spans thousands of years and is far too long and detailed to put in. However, as a slightly simpler version, it's an intriguing story, forming a great little bit of lore.   Bandos sends Dorgeshuun (1/12 goblin tribes, dorgeshuun means "goblins of the strong spears" more or less) to an impossible battle. Their general, Bloodfist, refuses and leads them into a fissure. The whole tribe. This is hundreds of goblins.   Bandos spots this and smites the fissure they go into, collapsing the exit. Bloodfist is killed, so Lieutenant Strongaxe leads them. They find a big cave and establish Dorgesh-Kaan, their city.   The goblins reject all gods and remove Bandos' insignia. They mine and use fire to light the pitch black caves, using bones to build their structures.   In traditional Bandosian culture, the place is ruled by generals who gain their position by slaying the general before. A council of elders is made to advise these generals as they rule.   Eventually the public call for the elders to rule instead of the generals in a vote. Bonehelm, the ruler, disagrees. The mob marches on Bonehelm's palace and the civil war begins.   Bonehelm and his small, but skilled army, is forced out into the adjacent caves. They tame the giant frogs and use them as mounts for their archer contingents. Unfortunately despite this they are driven back from the city when they attack again, and the caves collapse on Bonehelm and his soldiers. The council now rule.   The Era of Peace sees the establishment of a scribe to keep the histories and great prosperity with only a small police force instead of an unnecessary army (they have no enemies). The dorgeshuun develop aqueducts, technology, and advanced architecture, making them one of the most advanced technological civilisations of their time.   The Dorgeshuun explore local caves, discovering the chasm of light and various other creatures, and also the surface world's light.   A series of small earthquakes then rock southern misthalin, opening fissures into the lumbridge swamp caves in a chain of events that will eventually see Dorgesh-Kaan reestablishing contact with the outer world.   ~Helm Lardar~

Helm Lardar

Helm Lardar

 

Tycoon Of The Royal Botanical Gardens 2

I got started on a nice Guthix guide, which really needs doing because not even the wiki has a proper section on the subject, but unfortunately the wiki no longer hosts the god letters (I thought they did ) which means I can't do it now. Maybe I'll try Bandos or Armadyl.   I've been playing Zoo Tycoon 2. It's a game I've had for ages, but I've recently started to think: what would make it better? It is a children's game, it's quite fun, it's quite old, suggestions are unecessary, but that's how I roll.       Now, all of these ideas are a little bit impractical, so I'm going to condense them.   1) Buildings. You can design and place buildings on the map, ranked in cost according to materials used, to house creatures such as reptiles and fish. All building work now requires a small amount of time and a small complement of builders. In addition, maintenance men take on the additional task of cleaning buildings, and you can hire a new member off staff to detail security. You must have at least one central building containing the head office, from which the zoo is managed.   2) New rules on enclosures. Firstly, you are told how much space you need for the animals you propose to buy before you start making them, and then you plan them out. Each enclosure needs two sections: one private, one public. These can be accessed through a gate that can be locked electronically. For some species, the private section may need to be indoors as they might be used to warmer climates-but that depends what climate you're in. Zookeepers can no lonker simply walk into the enclosure: instead, the animals must be tempted into the alternate zone before the empty zone can be cleaned. At more advanced levels of zoo, you can start adding electronic feeders and so on, but this is expensive.   3) Get rid of the Safari and Jungle themes. They are overpowered (no research is required for any of them and they are all available from day 1) and if I want to keep the zoo 'standard' theme then it is difficult to find the standard themed set pieces.   4) Special Guests. In addition to your normal clientele, the zoo...   ...interestingly enough, I just released my entire stock of animals on the guests. Zebras, Thomson's Gazelles, Moose, Ibex, and a couple of adult brown bears.   Guess what the brown bears did? Well, the man attacked a visitor. And then had sex.   Interestingly enough, the male (who sounds remarkably like Chewbacca) is actually the female's son, since I sent the dominant man to the wild. He got her pregnant. Enough on that, I think.   ....as I was saying, in addition to your classical clientele, you've got some special visitors. Two off the top of my head are critics and health inspectors: critics will boost or decrease your attendance and fame ratings, while health inspectors can do the same: albeit based on whether your enclosures meet appropriate standards, are safe, etc. You can assign a person to guide them round and that will improve their opinion: it'll be someone from your head office or a zookeeper.   5) A fast forward button! Double speed! Triple speed! A month a minute!   ~Helm Lardar~

Helm Lardar

Helm Lardar

 

How To Fix Smithing Cruelly

I might post later about lore (tempted to write a guide for some more gods, because it's entertaining, although I'd need somebody else to take pictures) but right now I think I'll do a short blog.   Much like the crafting requirement to repair various high level magical armours recently, make all melee stuff that currently requires repair require a relevant smithing level to repair it: something that can maybe be assisted, maybe not.   Get rid of that weird cash to NPC thing: it might make a bit of sense, but frankly if I have 80 smithing I am one of the better smiths in the land and should be about as proficient as Tindal merchant or Bob of Bob's brilliant axes.   So: Barrows armour requires level 70 smithing and a furnace/anvil and, hmm, how about enchanted adamant that you buy from somewhere? Or make.   Chaotic weaponry and shields requite 80 smithing along with a little chaotic metal that you purchase from Marmaros with either coins or coins and tokens.   The frozen key requires 70 smithing to repair it, in addition to the usual stuff.   Nex armour requires 85 smithing to repair, and maybe 85 crafting, and you buy some of the materials from Ashuelot Reis or maybe they are dropped by an NPC.   What else is there around that's degradable for melee? Not that much, but I'm sure it'll come in time: you get the idea, anyway. Just like that, we have a good reason to train smithing that fits the character of the existing skill in-game, perhaps gives a little more experience, and on the whole makes far more sense than your current 'money automatically solves everything'. You might not be skilled enough to make these weapons, but with the appropriate knowledge in the smithing skill you can certainly repair them, and the materials, despite also being tough to use by any but the most famed smiths are around to get if you know where to look for them.   Not posted in runescape suggestions, because it's a bit too crazy. Everyone would hate having to suddenly gain a bunch of smithing levels to use their armour conveniently (so perhaps barrows armour might prove to become a situation where you can req assist to repair armour or maybe you'll just end up trading it on the ge) but in my humble opinion it isn't too late to do this and the change would bring all the world of good.   Apart from anything else, the artisan's workshop made sure that training smithing in itself isn't actually that difficult and you can do it in a variety of intersting and expensive-less expensive ways.   The high level degradeable weapons and armour were *made* for smithing. If there's anything that fits the skill, it's these: so why don't we get rid of the "hey, you saved 50k!" mechanic and actually use it.   ~Helm Lardar~   P.S. the answer why is that everyone would be too afraid to make such a sudden, game-changing update after everyone has established for the last few years that smithing is never really going to be needed except in small, safe doses if you like doing quests.

Helm Lardar

Helm Lardar

 

Secret Identity Of The Raptor Revealed

This guy: Is the raptor, one of the seven signature heroes. The wiki isn't sure of his identity, but today, I worked it out: this is fresh concept art that Kotaku have shown us here: http://kotaku.com/5874658/runescape-is-get...me-art/gallery/ (Runescape isn't actually getting a facelift, they don't understand how Jagex do things incrementally) but it did have one particular image that showed me who the raptor really was.   In the spoiler below.       In other news, if my Zaros guide gets accepted (see previous blog) I'll make some more. But those ones I'll need people to gather pics for. Oh, and if anyone can help on the Conquest guide Samsara and I co-wrote to finish it off (we need a map done, I think, and maybe some other stuff) then that would be really handy too. It would be just in time for the drive. Check guides-in-progress to see both.   ~Helm Lardar~

Helm Lardar

Helm Lardar

 

Zaros: A Guide I'd Like To Be Read.

Guys, look at my guide on Zaros and critique it.   Please?   http://runescape.salmoneus.net/forums/inde...howtopic=354841   It's a response to this topic: http://runescape.salmoneus.net/forums/inde...howtopic=354660   I would be happy to write more but unable to take pictures for a while as I wouldn't be able to get on RS.   ~Helm Lardar~

Helm Lardar

Helm Lardar

 

Money And The Censor

Went around care/nursing homes all day.   Went to KBD, got 100k loot.   Gambled, made that into roughly 200-400k more loot (hard to keep track).   Put an offer in for a visage at 5.01M. Hopefully it'll buy, and I can then either keep as an excellent shield or sell for 8/9M (and visages might recover!).   Why are the words 'KKK' and 'Zybez' so offensive to Jagex, such clear outlets of rulebreaking, that they are censored for all players at all times? KKK is much like the word 'bloody', it can be used inoffensively and offensively. Indeed, discussion of the KKK as an organisation is hardly a bad thing at all and can even highlight some of their more ridiculous or amusing aspects. They have 'Grand Wizards'. Hello? Oh, and other funny things are (1) they placarded Westboro once, and (2) the Game Moderators (Pmods in runescape) in clichequest (thenoobcomic.com) are dressed up as the KKK.   Zybez, too. I understand Jagex had a spat with them, but censorship? Really? It's just not that sensible: Zybez is an upstanding fansite and doesn't deserve that kind of treatment.

Helm Lardar

Helm Lardar

 

Well That Was Fun

So: While Guthix Sleeps is complete. It was an entertaining quest, and a long quest that expanded a lot of nice lore. Movario's a pretty cool guy. What can I say? The first grandmaster quest is exciting and unusual.   I'm going back to school soon, so I probably won't be doing much more questing.       ~Helm Lardar~   P.S. Something I've noticed recently for you guys that don't care about me questing. Every time someone puts 0.0 at the end of a sentence or some other kind of emote (other than perhaps :) :) :o ) my rating of their statement goes down 4 points out of 10.   For example: WGS is a hard quest. 8/10 Compared with WGS is a hard quest 0.0 . 4/10

Helm Lardar

Helm Lardar

 

Scammed

I just got scammed for 2.5M. Yes, I'm an idiot who should know better after playing for several years and should have spotted the entire thing coming a mile away just as everybody else did, but for several reasons I failed to do so. I've given players advice, I've even thought condescending thoughts about the scammed. Generally speaking, however, scams are only noticeable in retrospect: much like the dreams in Inception, you only notice how strange the dream happened to be after you've woken up. Unless your mind is being hacked and someone points it out to you in an effort to gain greater secrets...yeah, that's completely irrelevant.   My net worth was 12M before, and I'm not asking for sympathy or money: that is unecessary even if I do like gifts of cash. I can make money for myself, and luckily my wealth wasn't entirely liquid: that in itself is a huge bonus and it's something I'd reccomend to everyone. Despite the clear annoyances of some slightly customised objects like barrows armour and painted weapons being untradeable immediately, it does stop you having a large and dangerous cash stack which saved me from losing even more: as it was, I gave out 2M in cash and my dragon square shield, scimitar, longsword, and boots.   Here's how the scam went: Some guy's doing a giveaway, lots of money, no wilderness. Lots of people follow to Varrock Palace in the central courtyard. He hosts a giveaway of 1M based on his favourite animal. Some guy wins it: each person gets to guess in turn and as it happens as I was at the start of the line I got to guess twice. The second person to guess twice wins. He's traded 1M.   Scammer tells me how he is giving away his wealth because he needs to reduce playing for GCSEs. I can relate, I'm sucked in. His second version is a trust trade. Everyone leaves except me, the guy who won a mill, the scammer, and a random dude with a partyhat. I figure hey, let's stick around, the partyhat dude is very silent and thee guy who one 1M doesn't exactly look well moneyed. I might win this guy's gear. I'll only bet 500k.   He gives 200k, given back. I go 210k, given back. He goes 500k, given back. I go 510k, given back. He goes 1M, given back. I go 1.5M, given back. He goes 2M, given back. I give 2M and my dragon square shield, a clear sign that I'm running out of cash.   The giving back is important because it gained my trust: it's an emotional, not a reasonable thing. Anyway, now it gets interesting. The guy who won 1M messages me saying he's running out of money too. We've both gone to the bank to pick up items we can pawn to him, he suggests we cap it, I suggest 2.5M, we agree. We go back to the scammer, I ask the current bid, he says 2.5M. Without consulting the other guy, I bid a bit more because he obviously did that earlier and forgot, and we both say I'm out when the scammer asks if we have any more.   Then he doesn't give back my stuff and says I've won, starts taking armour off, asks to see rest of my inv, I oblige, he declines and tabs.   Why didn't I spot that the guy who won 1M was the scammer's friend? Because I'd never heard of it before. I had a reason to trust the scammer (a story I could sympathise with and an earlier giveaway), I had a reason to trust the scammer's friend (cheap-ish appearance...pumpkin mask should have warned me but gold hammer and cooking cape said something different) and the fact that he'd won 1M and seemed so happy about it before. The scammer had a mask and bandos and claws: he stood nothing to gain from our cheap bids! Why would he scam that? And hey, why shouldn't we do a little match-fixing? The only problem was I couldn't trust the friend enough to let him have the final bid and so my money has gone.   What a fool I am, but a lucky fool nonetheless. Not all my money was immediately liquid. I wasn't prepared to bet too much. It wasn't the most obvious of scams.   What got me was that I believed in the scammer's friend, who acted the part superbly. It sounds stupid, but he struck me as a man I could know and trust and be friends with. He said 'keep me added' after. Partyhat man told me he was the scammer's friend.   One thing still gets me, though. Why did party hat man, who watched the whole thing in silence, only tell me how the scam had worked after I'd lost my money? It could have been a borrowed blue party hat-it was the only expensive thing in his outfit-but he seemed sensible.   Don't fall for the scammer's friend, people. It didn't cost me more than 2.5M of my 12M total bank wealth (including god books priced as they were when I bought them at 2.5M together), but it could have gone quite a lot worse. Yes, there were clues all along, but it's only when you step back and look that you understand how all of them fit together and how obvious it should have been, because at the time I was guided by my emotions and I believed that I could trust if not the obvious scammer then the scammer's friend.   ~Helm Lardar~

Helm Lardar

Helm Lardar

 

What I Don't Like About Summoning.

I can't summon familiars into combat to help me fight most of the time.   There are a few exceptions to this rule. If I have a very high level (80+) any familiars I do get will probably be stronger than me. There are also some familiars with passive abilities that are helpful, such as the bunyip, unicorn, and beasts of burden.   Unfortunately, most familiars are useless. They either have an odd non-combat characteristic that makes them occasionally convenient, for example the fruit bat is used for some hunters to deliver fruit on the go and by some people to make money with summoning potions. Or the praying mantis, which should be useful (it's a purely combat familiar with a magic attack) but nobody actually uses it because...familiar combat's not that great.   There are three types of familiar that are useful. The beast of burden. The healer. The titan. The rest have odd niche uses that have their use reduced by necessitating visiting obelisks, thus interrupting skilling. They're also thoroughly inconvenient because you can't use the grand exchange, so to be honest unless you know you're spending an hour at that place doing that thing they probably aren't worth summoning.   The skill is certainly useful, but...not half as useful as any other combat skill, including prayer. It's probably not broken. But it isn't that useful. To me.   Oh, and Kemosabe: in order to understand how useful the skill is for a medium level, what level should I train it to? 70?   ~Helm Lardar~

Helm Lardar

Helm Lardar

 

Summoning!

Obviously summoning as a skill is pretty entrenched and any suggestions are pretty useless. Regardless, I came up with some proposals and thought I'd put them here, despite the clear point that summoning couldn't possibly change so radically. Got it? Good.   Anyway, here's what I think would make the summoning skill work better. Three simple proposals.   After seeing that summoning is very closely related to magic, I do think that charms might be easier to get. Or at least possible to get magically, or maybe...actually, I have no idea. What would be an interesting move would be to make more charms necessary for familiars, and more xp for making a pouch, such that you didn't have nearly as many wasted familiars to become junk. Nobody needs 552 barker toads, so why try and get players to make them?   Second idea is to make summoning work in a single-combat area. Seriously, why doesn't this already happen? The summoned creature is an extension of yourself and a projection of your magical ability, so there's no good reason for this not to happen. Apart from anything else, it would improve summoning's role in PvP. Yes, combat level based on summoning might need to be adjusted.   Third idea is to get rid of those weird summoning numbers at the top right of the interface. The official term seems to be 'summoning points'. Now, as far as I'm aware this does two things: firstly, it stops the player constantly using a summoned being's abilities, and second, it stops the player summoning another creature shortly after the first has run out.   Why? Why does it do that? What's the point? If I want to constantly use a summon's abilities, I'm already restricted by their special attack bar, and if I really want to I can use potions to completely sidestep that issue. Not allowing extra summoning doesn't help at all: sure, if you want something to hurt a summoning player make sure it drains that stat, but don't just stop me for no reason. This has no advantage and several disadvantages: I shouldn't have to visit little obelisks all the time to strengthen my connection with the spirit world: that is what my pouch did when I summoned the damn thing! When my connection has gone (ie pouch has run out) I will not be able to keep my summon and it will dissapear unless I renew it with another pouch.   So what do these suggestions bring? They're not that complex. They can't be that handy. Well, in my opinion, they have several advantages over the current system. Firstly, it rewards players who have trained summoning by letting them use a summoned creature anywhere, anytime, usefully. Second, it rewards players in a tiered and slowly increasing manner that gets better over time rather than at sudden jumps in high levels. Which is good. Not all skills acheive it, but summoning has the potential to. Third, it gets rid of a bunch of useless pouches.   I think that the summoned creature should be an extension of the self, that it should act as an extra weapon or a new piece of armour, and that it should not be consigned to a team-mate or helper, because that gets rid of much of the potential of the summoning skill to actually work in all combat.   ~Helm Lardar~   P.S. Happy to explain further beef with summoning if you don't get why I think these ideas (especially 2) should be implemented.

Helm Lardar

Helm Lardar

 

Behind The Scenes: January!

Yay! The BTS is up! Always a treat at the start of the year, this is no exception, but this year's BTS looks particularly splendid. Let's go through the thing in order of how it's laid out.   First of all: the Barrows Update! Along with a witty joke that made me laugh heartily, Jagex have decided to cheapen the DFS (yay because it's a powerful shield that I would like one day) and make Barrows armour look awesome. I recently purchased some of the heaviest armour available to me (heavy as in good for tanking hits IE Torag the Corrupted's armour without his hammers. I sold my guthans to do so, as I wasn't using it and will have a healing sword (the Enhanced Excalibur) soon. This update will both make them look excellent and perhaps decrease the price of getting new bits of barrows armour, the go-to equipment for anyone in the mid-high level combat range. And hey, the barrows will look awesome...I'm not sure what's not to like.   One question this does raise is whether other sets of armour will be graphically updated (as announced at runefest, all metal armour is getting a planned upgrade apart from the unique stuff) as said in runefest, or whether that stuff has been delayed. Maybe they'll plan it in with another update, maybe not.   It is a shame, however, that things like the Draconic Visage are no longer game-changing. 10M is a lot, but it's still a lot less than 30M. In one sense this is good, because it means rollbacks are less painful. In another sense, it means that people are increasingly having to rely on stronger bosses for great drops. I don't actually know if this is good or bad. It might be neither.   Secondly, the dramatically named Firemaker's Curse!   Interesting. Not as exciting as I initially thought (for some reason I thought of an instanced raid with other players) but as a quest that's pretty high level. A lot of training involved for your average quester. Who uses the circus nowadays? Everyone else but me? Thought so. New pets sounds okay. New firemaking training sounds good. To be honest, it just expands the skill, which is not a bad thing: firemaking needs to become a properly fleshed out skill and as much as some people think that means adding a few combat advantages and special items, it's really about making it practical to train. Laying long lines of logs from 75-99 with only one type of log is not really enough for an entire skill, and this adding to the Jadinko Lair's firemaking capacity is good. I'd like to see lighting up dungeons permanently with firemaking and construction, actually: I think that would be really helpful as I wouldn't need a light source and more in some areas.   Now for the third update: Hati and Skoll.   Great! I hope they implement this sooner rather than later, as last year they said Hati would be around from the beginning of Jan. I hope the cape flows, and I'm looking forward to some swanky new boots. By the look of them, I thought Skoll would be a yeti or snow troll, but it doesn't seem that way. hati was fun last year, and should be fun this year too :D . By the way, when I say I hope the cape flows, I mean: if it's small and flowy, I won't wear it, if it's big and like a piece of cardboard, I probably won't wear it, but if it's big and flows (see: eagle cape, which doesn't look great standing but looks incredible running) I will be wearing it almost all the time. Please make it flow, animator. I would like a nice set of wolf peripherals.   Final update: Troll Warzone.   It's good to see burthorpe being revamped, as there are several oddities surrounding it: despite a solid set of quest lines and NPCs, Burthorpe is ill-frequented and ill-used and still has strange things like a troll-fighting force that uses claws (LOLwat?) and a games room...with crap versions of IRL games. It should be fun: I'm hoping they'll put in a central bank and reinforce the connotation of the imperial guard to the warrior's guild, along with adding a few handy shops, maybe a marketplace, and make greater sense of the palace, castle, and ruling prince. Sadly, they probably won't do any of that, which is a shame, but...it would be cool if they did. New quests should be fun to play (even if Denulth is a pretty cool guy). It's a bit confusing to see how an update on Burthorpe merits new taverly quests (which already seem pretty strong) but that's okay, and since Burthorpe is one of the first towns new members visit it is ideally suited to becoming the member's equivalent of lumbridge with some higher level combat thrown in too!   In other news, a new skill interface. Interesting. I really like the current one, but so long as they only change it graphically, everything will be OK. I'm not a fan of the brown interface or quest favicons on NPCs: I think they look gimmicky and remove some of the difficulty of knowing just who to talk to, while also taking up room for important questing NPCs. Ah well. Times must change.   ~Helm Lardar~

Helm Lardar

Helm Lardar

 

Sword Of The Big High War God

I recently bought a Bandos Godsword, and it's actually quite exciting to have a new, powerful weapon. I'm sure some of you come across fancy swords and staffs all the time, but not all of us are rich and high-levelled, so it was quite something to be holding what was, for a very long time, one of the more expensive weapons in runescape.   Nowadays, sadly, most people think it isn't very good. A superceded weapon, they say: terrible for training, useless special attack, always was useless, overpriced, bah.   I like it. It hits high. The special hits slightly higher, which is nice in PvP. It's slow, but generally when trying to hit something is more of an issue than dps itself, it's much better than a whip, and it helps me win duels. I'm looking forward to killing a quest boss with it (having to get out my Anchor for Glod prompted the purchase) . The sword might be heavy and the lack of a shield irritating, but frankly it is still a fun weapon to use.   And I don't have to pay 2M every 10 hours, and I don't need 80 dungeoneering and 80 attack.   Win.   ~Helm Lardar~

Helm Lardar

Helm Lardar

 

24h Party Sheeple

Canting's bi-annual 24 hour party was on yesterday. I was able to host 2 events, which was nice, so I'll give you my review of everything I was around to do:   Pubcrawl. I hosted this one, originally I thought that some sort of game (?) would work. Actually, a much better idea was to give a talk on the bar, so I did that in the last 3 bars and the longhall. They got longer towards the end. I wish I'd started with that, but the final bar (Musa Point) and accompanying info was well received with a round of applause started by none other than Merch Gwyar herself <_< . Maybe in the summer I'll do a tour of a city-Keldagrim actually really strikes my fancy, although perhaps Dorgesh-Kaan might also work well, both are after all relatively unknown and therefore full of interesting things. Perhaps Keldagrim would be better, since the Dorgeshuun took a literal approach to the cave city ethos and most of it appears to be houses. It's also on several levels, which...actually, that's an interesting thing. I'll make my mind up when the time comes.   Now, what other events were there? Orix hosted fight pits, which I really enjoyed: it was a nice opportunity to try out my new Bandos Godsword (I'll review that more fully in another blog) which I'd bought during Merch Gwyar's first house party that day (or was it citadel time) having just completed Grim Tales and struggled for lack of a heavier-hitting weapon than an anchor. I actually killed a few people using my epic prayer skills, but sadly died twice before having to go to lunch. A good, healthy event, and I'd love to try out such a friendly fight pits again!   I missed citadel part 2 (how convenient) and hosted Blast Furnace at 1500. Blast Furnace is one of those minigames that most people have never tried, supposedly, it involves a lot of complex and confusing work for very little reward. In actual fact, the reward is quite significant: training smithing for profit is not to be sniffed at, after all. It's also pretty easy. Only Orix, Merch Gwyar, and MFI turned up as I recall but we still had a good time and the clan leader said she might come again. Good. It's worth coming again. I can operate the blast furnace on my own, but as ever it is always easier with more people: once you get lots of people (see the official world) it becomes devastatingly efficient and you can see why the dwarves use it. It could do with a graphical update and an overground location in Keldagrim, though.   Then we had Trouble Brewing! Tanya hosted it, and our team won 7-0 in the first round. Then I had to leave. But I got a good bit of the stuff, so that was nice, and I'll be able to brew for a while longer. Everyone should learn to play TB, because despite being a dying minigame, it has excellent rewards!   Cossack hosted Barrows. That was okay. I'm not really a barrows man, I went in with slayer dart, a godsword, and a crossbow, and came out with all my prayer potions drunk. That's normally how it works. I forgot my ring of wealth. I didn't gain much, I didn't lose much.   That's all. Had some late-night combat in Merch Gwyar's house.   ~helm lardar~

Helm Lardar

Helm Lardar

 

Blast Furnace! A Little Pre-event Info

Tomorrow, I'm hosting the Blast Furnace event at 1500 GMT! That's UK time. It's going to be an exciting and fun event involving a rather underused minigame (apart from its official world) but you may not know much about it. Here are a few key details that I think everyone going out to know, or at least be able to know to tell anyone who asks:   You should bring: -Ores. These can be noted, as an NPC will un-note them for money while there. You'll need half as much coal as usual to metal: that's the pulling point of the furnace. -Coins. This is for un-noting ores and also for temporarily getting access to the anvils if you aren't level 60 smithing yet. -A bucket. This is for cooling your ore. I'll explain on the day, but essentially everyone will need one unless someone is always being super-alert. -A spade would probably be useful-I don't know if spades on the toolbelt can shovel the coal etc yet. -A hammer, if there isn't one on your toolbelt. -Sacred clay hammers, if you want to save money that way. Not necessary, but...   You should have: -60 Smithing. Not essential, but handy to use the anvils without cost. -Completed or at least started The Giant Dwarf. Without it, you won't be able to access Keldagrim. -Dwarven Stout or some similair brew if you want to boost to reach 60 smithing temporarily.   The best things to smith are arrowtips in the best metal you can. This makes a tidy profit, and they're also stackable. You'll produce bars very quickly once everything's going smoothly, but hammering out those arrowtips is still the best idea. The higher level the metal, the better profit you'll make: only iron and below fail to profit here.   I'll be trying to get closer to 73 smithing at the blast furnace, spending some of the Christmas money Orix so kindly gave me. It's a pre-requisite for the hard varrock tasks.   More info on the blast furnace is here: http://runescape.wikia.com/wiki/Blast_Furnace It should be noted, however, that this stuff is more easy to pick up on the go rather than by slogging through an article, with the only exceptions being that you must bring ores, coal, a bucket, and have started/completed The Giant Dwarf.

Helm Lardar

Helm Lardar

 

An Irrelephant 75 Firemaking

I got a new avatar-but isn't that a bit irrelephant?     Runescape doesn't need 11 weapons in every basic metal. In my opinion, 5 would do:   -Halberd to replace halberd, spear, and hasta with the advantages of all three. -Great Sword to replace longsword and 2h. -Shortsword to replace claws, dagger, and sword. -Mace to replace battleaxe, mace, and warhammer. -Scimitars. Because frankly, everyone loves them and if the greatsword is two-handed this will be the one-handed standard.   I'm sure that the dragon special attacks could be trimmed, merged, and generally made good. The key ones are DDS, Claws, and Spear. So Halberd gets shove/extra damage, Great Sword gets extra damage/prayer removal or whatever, shortsword gets extra damage in the form of a rushing thingy, etc.   I got 75 firemaking! Only two skills left: 76 cooking and 71 fishing. I also grew a white cat, and I'm going to feed my hellcat milk so they act nicely in the menagerie.  

Helm Lardar

Helm Lardar

 

Reform On The Anvil Pt Ii

For part I, see below. TL;DR An outline of precisely what's wrong with the smithing skill: it's not that there isn't plenty to do, it's that none of the stuff you can do is needed.   So what can be done? An outline for the future of the smithing skill was actually set up with the Artisan's Workshop update: for those of you that aren't aware, this is a place in Falador where you smith, repair, and update areas for dwarves, who are happy for you to put some effort into making expensive things for them.   This is great xp, and your produce is wanted. A shame your produce is expensive to make (that's not the future!) but the rest of the stuff is good.   Let's make things useful! Firstly, lower the high level requirements on making low level armour. The entire level table needs to be taken down a peg: rune should be a level 60/70 armour to make, not a level 99 thing. Those requirements were necessary when rune was the best money could buy: nowadays, it's not a pro armour at all. Some things need to progress. Make this progress. In order to do this, some of the level table might need to be simplified. Make 'basic armour' (sq shield, chain, med helm etc) one level up, 'complex armour' another, 'swords' one, 'clubs' another. If you like.   You're going to be thinking "what about level 99 smithers who worked hard to make rune armour?" Well, progress happens. Nobody gets that level for its sheer moneymaking power (what sheer moneymaking power?), and this obviously isn't the whole solution I'm bringing, so bear with me. If rune is a level 60 armour, I can feasibly get that in f2p to make acquiring my own rune set more simple for me and my friends. This might make rune cheaper: on the other hand, it might not, as mining rune will still be difficult to do and drops already account for a lot of the rune entering the world.   The second, and equally obvious point, is to make repair a necessary part of the melee playstyle. I can't stress this enough: without it, the whole skill will still be unnecessary. Make it so that every melee item has to be repaired every now and then, from bronze to beyond. Make it so that the amount of repair needed will be proportionate to the amount of damage taken, and so that when fully degraded your melee set will be unusable and will be worth as much as the full whack it would cost to make it again.   Don't repair based on coins, as has been done in the past: this must be done with metal bars, and so to repair one's armour one has to find a skilled smith to lend his assistance or raise your smithing skill yourself so that it is much more convenient to do so. This will also, of course, need to be done for weapons. On an anvil. Maybe you could trade your fully damaged armour on the GE, and smiths could buy it and resurrect it and put it back on the market for reasonable cost/xp.   Potentially, anvils could be specialised for different pieces of equipment: this smithy is designed to make swords, whereas that one was always intended to be used for platebodies. Just throwing that out there.   Here's the third point: making stuff for NPCs. Two nations at the moment have regular combat that I can think of: the gnomes and the dwarves. Other people have full time militaries: the various orders of knights, the various guards, hell, the elves need people to make stuff for them. You could be that guy.   You're a skilled smith, but why should you make this for free? If they want your skills, they should be prepared to pay for them: perhaps some extra bars for your own equipment each time, perhaps some of what they might otherwise drop when killed (coins, clue scrolls, crystals). Every guard force must have a smith: he could give you orders and you could fulfill them by smithing their armour. That would be very useful: not only would your goods be immediately wanted, but there would be good xp and rewards going up to (potentially) level 99. That I think is my most novel idea: smithing armour for NPCs would provide a valuable and interesting way to train that would be rewarded and would still be necessary.   Let's clarify that final point with an example: the gnomes. They go to war against Khazard, but they also have need of armour for guards and other such warriors. I walk into the stronghold, and talk to the head smith. He says that they've come up with a big shipment of steel, but they need the order filled and they don't have many armour-makers. Or he might say that he's got some damaged gnome armour that I need to repair. He knows me and I know him: I'm a high level smith able to complete such fiddly jobs, and make lots of stuff for him to use. As a reward for my hard work, he gives me some coins, or some mint cake, or something else that's useful.   A fourth idea is that we need to let smithing do something to high level armour, not just save money. Quite what, though, I'm not sure, which is why the third point is really the final one for now.   I need to make this better, so I'd like to know: what do you think? Without your commentary, this might as well be pointless: it is important for me to understand whether an idea is good or bad. If an idea is bad, I need to know why so that it can become good. At the moment, the real problem I have is between making smithing xp free in an unbalancing and potentially inflating way, and making it worth levelling.   I made this blog because I don't think this subject has been discussed for a while, and if it has, it is lacking in vaguely practical ideas or vaguely useful ideas. Smithing isn't hard to work out training methods for, but the skill does need to be a useful thing and not only at high but also low level too.   ~Helm Lardar~

Helm Lardar

Helm Lardar

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