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This fudgeing Week Man

Adam?

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Finals were this week. Also my capstone was due. I'm dying.

 

Friday: Due date for people in my capstone group to get their shizzle to me since I volunteered to compile (rewrite) the paper. Originally due on Thursday but two people in our group who don't do anything complained about how busy they were. One sends over her shizzle (which amounted to 400 fudgeing words of garbage) at 3am so I wasn't able to start her section.

Saturday: Have all of the stuff. Spend the day rewriting, organizing, writing new sections.

Sunday: Do the same thing as Saturday.

Monday: Keep doing that. This was supposed to be done on Saturday but I underestimated how bad their submissions would be. They continue to say they are too busy to help. The one other group member who does anything had to have an emergency root canal and was out of commission.

Tuesday: Capstone presentation in the morning. It goes really well and our client talks about how professional the paper and presentation (which I also did) were. Immediately after get off at CRAM CENTRAL STATION for Labor Economics and financial crisis exam.

Wednesday: 8:30 econ exam. Study until 4 for financial crisis exam. Content covered was dozens of papers ranging from 30 pages to 150 pages. It was a shizzle ton of content. Finish exam at 6:00 pm and begin studying for intermediate micro exam.

Thursday: 8:30 micro exam. This was a shizzle show. I was burnt out and didn't have nearly enough time to prepare. Worst I've ever done on an exam. Finish the exam and then have to run off to work until 5. Get off of work and begin writing 10 page paper due Friday, whose prompt I got a week prior and haven't had a chance to start writing.

Friday. Wake up at 4am and continue writing. Get half of it done and go to work. Now I'm at work and I still have 5 pages to write when I get back.

 

Worst week at college by a longshot. There are two weeks for finals and I managed to have the four I have fall over the course of the first three days alongside the capstone. Thanksgiving break should have been used to study more, but I finishing up end of year assignments at this time.



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Further proof team projects suck but no one realizes it and think it promotes "teamwork."

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What kind of rock have professors been living under that prevents them from realizing how horrendous group projects are?

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Money is important to business, but i think you need to move on to the core Management modules;

Who & how to yell at - How to pass the buck (or the blame) - Time compression, expecting the impossible.

 

None of them involve group projects because no-one could expect another manager to think further than protecting his own neck in the real world. Scott Adams has written several works for this courses study material.

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What kind of rock have professors been living under that prevents them from realizing how horrendous group projects are?

 

OK, confession time... I'm currently writing the assignments and specifications for the first module I'm in charge of at University (I've already been lecturing this semester, but as a tag team, from other people's notes, or to their lesson plans, this is the first one I'm doing by myself). Apart from a 1500 word write-up at the end, it's entirely group projects.

 

In my defence, this is pretty much the only way to do the module - it's designed to give students experience of lots of different roles in a creative team. I'm looking for every way I can reward the ones who actually do all the work, and penalize those who do as little as possible or claim credit where it's not due... any ideas, folks?

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Guitarguy, on , said:

 

What kind of rock have professors been living under that prevents them from realizing how horrendous group projects are?

 

OK, confession time... I'm currently writing the assignments and specifications for the first module I'm in charge of at University (I've already been lecturing this semester, but as a tag team, from other people's notes, or to their lesson plans, this is the first one I'm doing by myself). Apart from a 1500 word write-up at the end, it's entirely group projects.

 

In my defence, this is pretty much the only way to do the module - it's designed to give students experience of lots of different roles in a creative team. I'm looking for every way I can reward the ones who actually do all the work, and penalize those who do as little as possible or claim credit where it's not due... any ideas, folks?

Huh, it's good to see that you, unlike many others, are actively willing to put attention toward giving people what they put in. Alas, I have no ideas on how to accomplish that :(. No ideas that couldn't easily be abused, at least.

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I think group projects are overdone, for example I don't really see the point of group projects in elementary school or middle school. Eventually you need to assign group projects though. When you enter the workforce chances are you will be working in a group of some sort. Civilization is basically one big group project. If someone isn't doing their fair share complain loudly to them or your professor/boss/teacher. It seems kind of rude but these people are your co-workers not friends.

 

Now in Adam?'s case he doesn't really have any recourse because the course is about to end, so yeah that's bad, but still don't give group projects a bad wrap.

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I know things get incredibly difficult sometimes, but always remember that I love you.

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