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Gnomercy

New computer

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What kind of hard drive do you have? If it's an old computer it's very likely that you have a slow one.

 

Those AMD CPUs are decent but they get wrecked by Intel in every price bracket. And you won't be able to install them in your old motherboard if that's what you were getting at.

 

Core i5 2500k is the best gaming CPU you can buy right now. The more expensive i7s have additional features that games don't take advantage of anyway. In benchmark tests, the FPS difference between them is minuscule.

OK I was just wondering. I was hoping for something under $160, but the i5 2500k is $220. However if it is a clear leader, then I suppose $60 is worth it.

 

AM3+ processors requires either an AM3 or AM3+ motherboard.

Those CPUs are capable enough when gaming, but the Core i5 is the clear leader. As I said, though, Intel's launching their next generation CPUs & matching chipsets shortly. A likely release date is April 8th. Benchmarks are already floating around for Ivy Bridge chips. There's also been a ton of teasers for Z77 motherboards and we know that most H67/P67/Z68 motherboards will support Ivy Bridge as a drop-in upgrade. The problem with that is the 70-series chipsets natively support 4 USB 3.0 ports and PCI Express 3.0--most 60-series chipsets use 3rd party USB 3.0 controllers and true PCI-E 3.0 compatibility is yet to be seen. I haven't seen new native USB 3.0 controller benchmarks; it's possible that they'll outperform most of today's solutions.

 

If you plan to upgrade again within 2 years, it's probably best to grab a K-edition CPU even if you don't plan to overclock (and it doesn't sound like you do). Reason being they should have better resale values when put on eBay. Pass on a K-edition if your budget is too tight or you never plan to upgrade the CPU.

 

The Phenom II X4 and FX-4100 are both lackluster compared to even Core i3's. The FX-6100 is a tad better but it's inferior to preceding Phenom II X6's.

So are you saying to get the i5 2500K or to wait for the new one to come out?

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OK I was just wondering. I was hoping for something under $160, but the i5 2500k is $220. However if it is a clear leader, then I suppose $60 is worth it.

You gotta look at the whole package price. If budget and future upgrade is your primary concern, it'd probably be worth $10 to buy the 2500K and a low-end board (H61 or cheap H67). The 2500K is a clear leader against any of those AMD chips. Here's a look at a stock-speed i5-2500K versus AMD's higher-end FX-8150: http://www.anandtech.com/bench/Product/434?vs=288 The 2500K occasionally matches and usually beats their fastest 8-core CPU. Further, low-end boards for AMD setups tend not to support the top-end chips--they can't supply adequate power. Low-end boards for Intel setups USUALLY support the top-end chips. Whereas you could use a $50 Intel H61 motherboard, you might be stuck using a $75 AMD 880G motherboard.

 

AM3+ processors requires either an AM3 or AM3+ motherboard.

Those CPUs are capable enough when gaming, but the Core i5 is the clear leader. As I said, though, Intel's launching their next generation CPUs & matching chipsets shortly. A likely release date is April 8th. Benchmarks are already floating around for Ivy Bridge chips. There's also been a ton of teasers for Z77 motherboards and we know that most H67/P67/Z68 motherboards will support Ivy Bridge as a drop-in upgrade. The problem with that is the 70-series chipsets natively support 4 USB 3.0 ports and PCI Express 3.0--most 60-series chipsets use 3rd party USB 3.0 controllers and true PCI-E 3.0 compatibility is yet to be seen. I haven't seen new native USB 3.0 controller benchmarks; it's possible that they'll outperform most of today's solutions.

 

If you plan to upgrade again within 2 years, it's probably best to grab a K-edition CPU even if you don't plan to overclock (and it doesn't sound like you do). Reason being they should have better resale values when put on eBay. Pass on a K-edition if your budget is too tight or you never plan to upgrade the CPU.

 

The Phenom II X4 and FX-4100 are both lackluster compared to even Core i3's. The FX-6100 is a tad better but it's inferior to preceding Phenom II X6's.

So are you saying to get the i5 2500K or to wait for the new one to come out?

Wait for the new one to come out. The i5-3570K should be priced the same and it'll definitely have higher resale. The alternative is to buy a used i5-2500/2500K.

 

The new Ivy Bridge chips should cut CPU power usage by about 20% and will produce at least equal performance in all areas.

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OK I was just wondering. I was hoping for something under $160, but the i5 2500k is $220. However if it is a clear leader, then I suppose $60 is worth it.

You gotta look at the whole package price. If budget and future upgrade is your primary concern, it'd probably be worth $10 to buy the 2500K and a low-end board (H61 or cheap H67). The 2500K is a clear leader against any of those AMD chips. Here's a look at a stock-speed i5-2500K versus AMD's higher-end FX-8150: http://www.anandtech...duct/434?vs=288 The 2500K occasionally matches and usually beats their fastest 8-core CPU. Further, low-end boards for AMD setups tend not to support the top-end chips--they can't supply adequate power. Low-end boards for Intel setups USUALLY support the top-end chips. Whereas you could use a $50 Intel H61 motherboard, you might be stuck using a $75 AMD 880G motherboard.

 

AM3+ processors requires either an AM3 or AM3+ motherboard.

Those CPUs are capable enough when gaming, but the Core i5 is the clear leader. As I said, though, Intel's launching their next generation CPUs & matching chipsets shortly. A likely release date is April 8th. Benchmarks are already floating around for Ivy Bridge chips. There's also been a ton of teasers for Z77 motherboards and we know that most H67/P67/Z68 motherboards will support Ivy Bridge as a drop-in upgrade. The problem with that is the 70-series chipsets natively support 4 USB 3.0 ports and PCI Express 3.0--most 60-series chipsets use 3rd party USB 3.0 controllers and true PCI-E 3.0 compatibility is yet to be seen. I haven't seen new native USB 3.0 controller benchmarks; it's possible that they'll outperform most of today's solutions.

 

If you plan to upgrade again within 2 years, it's probably best to grab a K-edition CPU even if you don't plan to overclock (and it doesn't sound like you do). Reason being they should have better resale values when put on eBay. Pass on a K-edition if your budget is too tight or you never plan to upgrade the CPU.

 

The Phenom II X4 and FX-4100 are both lackluster compared to even Core i3's. The FX-6100 is a tad better but it's inferior to preceding Phenom II X6's.

So are you saying to get the i5 2500K or to wait for the new one to come out?

Wait for the new one to come out. The i5-3570K should be priced the same and it'll definitely have higher resale. The alternative is to buy a used i5-2500/2500K.

 

The new Ivy Bridge chips should cut CPU power usage by about 20% and will produce at least equal performance in all areas.

So if I buy this new processor I'm going to need a new motherboard too?

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And don't forget new RAM. All this working still depends on your power supply.

Edited by Bob-sama

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And don't forget new RAM. All this working still depends on your power supply.

Where do I look inside my computer for the PSU?

And why do I need new RAM?

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The PSU is the box that is connected to the outlet with a cable. It converts your ac current into dc. It's in one of the back corners.

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XPower GTX Light 480

 

AC Input: 230Vac 50Hz 5A

DC Output: +3.3V +5V +12V1 +12V2 -12V +5Vsb

Max A: 25A 30A 20A 18A 0.8A 2.5A

Max Combined: 160W 300W 0.8A 2.5A

Total Max Output: 480W

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Ok well I wouldn't trust an upgrade, even one that drops power consumption, to that contraption. A Corsair TX650 V2 would be a good choice there. We still don't know what chassis you're using or what interface the optical drive or hard drive is. You COULD end up with only the chassis being usable and maybe not even that. (Which is why a new system is typically recommended; while you can get 2nd hand parts at good discounts, the best used stuff is most expensive while the cheapest used stuff has probably outlived its usefulness. It's tough to find recent hardware at good prices.)

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So can I just replace that then?

And how do I find out what chassis I'm using?

 

Optical Drive: SONY DVD RW DW-G120A ATA Device

Hard Drives: 156GB Western Digital WDC WD1600JS-08MHB0 ATA Device (SATA)

1TB Seagate External

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Looks like you could keep the hard drive (and external) but the optical drive appears to be IDE. As for the chassis, the easiest way would be to find at least a brand and compare it across their models. Taking a picture might help--some of us (myself included) have seen a LOT of computer cases and figure it out.

 

As it appears, if you do upgrade, the price might have been worthwhile if you could keep the chassis, hard drive, optical drive, and power supply. Since the latter two will probably need to be replaced, I don't think it was worthwhile. It's a fine system for casual use--office, internet, and "basic" connectivity (messaging programs including Skype), and pretty old gaming. The 8800GTS-320 is capable enough for Source games and older Gamebryo games. Newer titles tend to demand more Video RAM so you're pretty limited--many AAA titles (including Skyrim) barely work on low/medium with sub-512MB cards.

 

tl;dr: Post a few pictures and we can probably figure out what chassis you're using.

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So basically you're saying, I'd need to upgrade my optical drive, graphics card, PSU, motherboard and processor?

 

I'll keep looking on the internet for the chassis. It has no clear brand name on it. If I don't find it, I'll upload some pictures.

 

In the mean time, what's your thoughts on this?

http://www.gumtree.com/p/for-sale/desktop-case-with-psu-465w-video-card-agp-main-board-ram/98505480

 

ATX Case

Ge-force 5700 fx

PSU 465W

Main board, Memory 1gb, CPU intel one, Wireless card & DVD Burner

 

For $55

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So basically you're saying, I'd need to upgrade my optical drive, graphics card, PSU, motherboard and processor?

 

I'll keep looking on the internet for the chassis. It has no clear brand name on it. If I don't find it, I'll upload some pictures.

 

In the mean time, what's your thoughts on this?

http://www.gumtree.c...rd-ram/98505480

 

ATX Case

Ge-force 5700 fx

PSU 465W

Main board, Memory 1gb, CPU intel one, Wireless card & DVD Burner

 

For $55

Worse than you have now; definitely don't get it.

 

Another option is to and keep the motherboard you have.

 

http://www.amazon.co...31990674&sr=8-1

http://www.amazon.co...31990781&sr=1-1

http://www.amazon.co...31990862&sr=1-1

 

Then try & make due on ~3.5GB RAM (due to using the 32-bit version of Windows 7; you may be able to download a 64-bit version and reinstall).

 

That won't be as fast as a Core i5-2500K but it should do a good enough job gaming and is a clear upgrade in CPU and GPU speed (and puts in an reliable PSU).

Edited by Bob-sama

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So basically you're saying, I'd need to upgrade my optical drive, graphics card, PSU, motherboard and processor?

 

I'll keep looking on the internet for the chassis. It has no clear brand name on it. If I don't find it, I'll upload some pictures.

 

In the mean time, what's your thoughts on this?

http://www.gumtree.c...rd-ram/98505480

 

ATX Case

Ge-force 5700 fx

PSU 465W

Main board, Memory 1gb, CPU intel one, Wireless card & DVD Burner

 

For $55

Worse than you have now; definitely don't get it.

 

Another option is to and keep the motherboard you have.

 

http://www.amazon.co...31990674&sr=8-1

http://www.amazon.co...31990781&sr=1-1

http://www.amazon.co...31990862&sr=1-1

 

Then try & make due on ~3.5GB RAM (due to using the 32-bit version of Windows 7; you may be able to download a 64-bit version and reinstall).

 

That won't be as fast as a Core i5-2500K but it should do a good enough job gaming and is a clear upgrade in CPU and GPU speed (and puts in an reliable PSU).

So it will be good at gaming? And that would mean I'd only need to get the processor, PSU and graphics card. And that I would keep the RAM, motherboard and Optical Drive?

 

EDIT: Also, would I have to buy 64-bit?

Edited by Gnomercy

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To show you roughly how they stack up...

 

Your 4600+ versus a similar Phenom II X4: http://www.anandtech...roduct/88?vs=35

The Phenom II X4 versus a Core i5-2500K: http://www.anandtech...oduct/88?vs=288

 

The X4's faster than your current setup by leaps and bounds; it's only really deficient in CPU-limited games like Far Cry 2 & Civilization V. The advantage there is it'll save money and yes, give you a few years of better gaming. The HD6870 is technically already replaced but it's faster than the new HD 7770 and typically cheaper too. The HD 7850 isn't bad from a price or performance standpoint but it's still more expensive. I'm certainly not upgrading my HD 5850 to an HD 7850/7870.

 

You don't need to purchase a 64-bit copy--you have a 32-bit copy already. Assuming it's an OEM or Retail license (and not a wholly pointless Upgrade license), it's as easy as downloading the 64-bit DVD, writing it to disk, reinstalling with your license key, and then installing drivers & programs. You'll want a backup of your current documents and downloaded games. Just make copies to your external 1TB hard drive. At least for me, it'd be hell to download 200GB of games (a fraction of my Steam library). Steam will try and run games without reconfiguring: verify the game's integrity if you have any problems and it'll restore it to stock settings. Origin will prompt you to reinstall the games--which you'll have to do for it to work correctly.

Edited by Bob-sama

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To show you roughly how they stack up...

 

Your 4600+ versus a similar Phenom II X4: http://www.anandtech...roduct/88?vs=35

The Phenom II X4 versus a Core i5-2500K: http://www.anandtech...oduct/88?vs=288

 

The X4's faster than your current setup by leaps and bounds; it's only really deficient in CPU-limited games like Far Cry 2 & Civilization V. The advantage there is it'll save money and yes, give you a few years of better gaming. The HD6870 is technically already replaced but it's faster than the new HD 7770 and typically cheaper too. The HD 7850 isn't bad from a price or performance standpoint but it's still more expensive. I'm certainly not upgrading my HD 5850 to an HD 7850/7870.

 

You don't need to purchase a 64-bit copy--you have a 32-bit copy already. Assuming it's an OEM or Retail license (and not a wholly pointless Upgrade license), it's as easy as downloading the 64-bit DVD, writing it to disk, reinstalling with your license key, and then installing drivers & programs. You'll want a backup of your current documents and downloaded games. Just make copies to your external 1TB hard drive. At least for me, it'd be hell to download 200GB of games (a fraction of my Steam library). Steam will try and run games without reconfiguring: verify the game's integrity if you have any problems and it'll restore it to stock settings. Origin will prompt you to reinstall the games--which you'll have to do for it to work correctly.

 

So this is all I need to buy?

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139020

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819103995

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Sapphire-11179-09-20G-6870-GDDR5-Graphics/dp/B004R7MTPQ/ref=sr_1_1?s=computers&ie=UTF8&qid=1331990862&sr=1-1

 

And also, is this PSU useless?

 

Bestec ATX-300-12Z REV.: BC

Input: 100-127V~7A , 200-240V~4A 60/50Hz

Output: +12V / 19A, -12V / 0.8A

300W Max +5V / 30A, +5VSB / 2A (peak 2.5A)

+3.3V / 28A

 

+5V & 3.3V 180W MAX. +5V & +12V 288W MAX

 

Just wondering, as it's a part from my old computer which has a corrupted hard drive, and I wanted to know if I should just get rid of this or not.

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That PSU is useless, yes. Those parts ought to work too.

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That PSU is useless, yes. Those parts ought to work too.

Ok, that's no problem! Thank you.

 

And which parts? The ones in the old computer? Or the ones I linked to?

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That PSU is useless, yes. Those parts ought to work too.

Ok, that's no problem! Thank you.

 

And which parts? The ones in the old computer? Or the ones I linked to?

Yes, the PSU IS pretty useless. It's an off-brand with a reputation for dubious quality. Even if it works today, it's definitely not efficient and I wouldn't trust more than an office machine to it (and even then I'd doubt its abilities). The Corsair unit is much better.

 

Those parts are correct; your location says you're in Northern Ireland so you can't use Newegg, which is why I suggested via Amazon UK.

  1. Ground yourself & unplug all the external cables (keyboard, mouse, ethernet, audio, display, power, etc.)
  2. Unbox the new hardware (CPU, heatsink, graphics card, power supply)
  3. Unplug the old power supply (which includes connectors on the graphics card, hard drive, optical drive, the 24-pin (2x12-pin) connector on the right edge of the board and the 4-pin (2x2-pin) connector on the top left edge.
  4. Remove the old graphics card (you need to push down on the white release tab on the orange slot, which will be blocked by the 8800GTS's cooler. Try a plastic ruler; you just gotta push it down so the card's latch can go free.)
  5. Unplug the heatsink's fan and remove the old heatsink (the stock heatsinks use a single latch on one side)
  6. Remove the old CPU: there'll be a latch on the bottom that swings up and unlocks the CPU. Keep the latch up after you're done.
  7. Remove the old power supply: unscrew it from the chassis.
  8. Install the new power supply but don't connect anything yet.
  9. Install the new CPU: examine around the CPU socket--one side should have an indented triangle that'll match up to a gold triangle on the CPU.
  10. Install the new heatsink (remove the plastic cover on its base, align one side of the latch against the retaining bracket, then the other side and push down on the latch to lock it in place)
  11. Plug in the new heatsink's fan.
  12. Plug in the new power supply's cables; the 4-pin (2x2-pin) connector on the top left near the CPU socket, the 24-pin (2x12-pin) connector on the right side, the 4-pin molex cable to the optical drive, and then SATA cable to the hard drive.
  13. Install the new graphics card into the orange slot, then the 6-pin (2x3-pin) power connectors too.
  14. Plug back in all the external cables again and power her up.
  15. Reset the BIOS (load defaults) & boot into Windows
  16. Install the Catalyst Control Center and Catalyst 12.2 drivers for Windows 7 64-bit.

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Damnit. I wrote a reply and it was eaten.

 

Anyways, looking at Aria, http://www.aria.co.uk/SuperSpecials/Other+products/XFX+AMD+Radeon+HD+6870+1024MB+GDDR5+PCI-Express+Graphics+Card+with+FREE+Deus+Ex+Game!+?productId=44533

 

That's about the best performance for the price; AMD's done a great job of improving and optimizing over its monthly driver program; the HD6870 roughly equals a GeForce GTX 560 in performance while typically costing less (at least here in the USA).

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So the one you posted in that link is the one to go for?

The specific brand doesn't matter much. Usually, the best graphics card brands are Sapphire, XFX, Gigabyte, Asus, and MSI--and that's more for warranty than features. One standard HD 6870 from each company will perform exactly the same; an overclocked version or might a little better. Ultimately, you're buying for the warranty service (length & terms including 2nd owner provisions) & accessories bundle (display interface adapters, power adapters, bundled software or games). That said, some graphics card brands (because of usually the warranty) have better resale values since the second owner can get full service. Other times, the warranty only applies for the presumed 1st owner which means, to use the warranty, you'd need their active cooperation or, barring that, the card is as-is.

 

So yes, go for the XFX Radeon HD 6870 that I linked to at Aria--better price and you're already planning on getting the CPU from there. If you want 3 for 3 from there, http://www.aria.co.uk/Products/Components/Power+Supplies/650W+or+less/650W+Corsair+TX650+V2+80PLUS+Bronze+Power+Supply+?productId=43905

Edited by Bob-sama

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Wait maybe I've missed something, but that phenom II isn't going to work with his am2 socket. Unless he posted that he has a different motherboard and I missed it since I'm on my phone.

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Wait maybe I've missed something, but that phenom II isn't going to work with his am2 socket. Unless he posted that he has a different motherboard and I missed it since I'm on my phone.

My motherboard is: ECS GF8100VM-M5

 

 

EDIT: I also can't seem to get my graphics card out. I press on the white bit with a plastic ruler, but no matter how hard I push the latch won't come out.

Edited by Gnomercy

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