Jump to content
Sal's RuneScape Forum
Sign in to follow this  
Sobend

Your favorite books

Recommended Posts

I'm not a big book guy, but I thought I'd make a topic where people could talk about their favorite books.

 

Here are some of mine:

 

Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea (Jules Verne)- A great adventure novel and my favorite book of all time. It's basically about a french professor who gets stuck on a 1860s submarine after the submarine has an accident with the ship he is on. It was one of the few books that I pretty much could not put down. It's Tom Clancy's favorite novel, so if you like him you may want to check this out.

 

Catcher in the Rye (J.D. Salinger) - I found the book during my senior year in high school when I was with my mom at the library. She wanted me to get something so I picked this out because a friend I had read it when I was a freshman. I read it right before I went to bed and then tried to sleep. However I could not get this book out of my head so I just turned the lights back on and kept reading until 2:30 on a school night. I found the first half really funny and the second half really deep and meaningful. I also read it when I was a similar age as the main character (Holden Caulfield) and just connected with him.

 

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Mark Twain) - Another great adventure story, but this one is more than just an adventure story. Very impressive how Mark Twain was able to put so much deep stuff into a boy book. And I think I am one of the few people who actually appreciate the Tom Sawyer cameo at the end.

 

The Things They Carried (Tim O'Brien) - A bunch of vignettes about the Vietnam War. Probably the best book ever written about a war. Also imo it has the best last chapter ever written, although I have not read every book so its tough for me to say that definitively.

 

Cannery Row (John Steinbeck) - Great book about camaraderie, the non-Romantic love people Hollywood and storywriters always forget about. Just like the previous book, it has a great last chapter.

Edited by Sobend

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love the Chicken Soup for the Soul book by Jack Canfield. It changed my view in life.

Edited by FrankDDougherty

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari is my favorite book.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/7/2013 at 6:25 AM, Sobend said:

Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea (Jules Verne)- A great adventure novel and my favorite book of all time. It's basically about a french professor who gets stuck on a 1860s submarine after the submarine has an accident with the ship he is on. It was one of the few books that I pretty much could not put down. It's Tom Clancy's favorite novel, so if you like him you may want to check this out.

I may try this sometime. Jules Verne is the person who made all sorts of strange prophecies about technology?

I recommend the Earthsea series by Ursula LeGuin, they were written more than fourty years ago but I believe they are still relevant. They are a healthy read.

Edited by Sajoh

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love reading. Covid kind of killed my streak, but back in 2019 I accomplished my goal of reading one book every week. Not quite at that mark nowadays, but I still read a few dozen books a year. I try to be extremely eclectic and find new books by getting recommendations from people I like / respect. In no particular order:

 

  • The Shadow of the Torturer by Gene Wolfe - Excellent fallen Earth sci-fi with an unreliable narrator. Gene Wolfe really lends himself to multiple readings
  • Malazan Book of the Fallen by Steven Erikson - My favorite fantasy series. I'm not usually an "epic fantasy" guy, but Erikson is a fantastic writer who takes a lot of cues from Glen Cooke's The Black Company. The first book is a little weaker than the others, but it's still solid. I can't recommend this highly enough.
  • A Fire Upon the Deep / A Deepness in the Sky by Vernor Vinge. Companion books that do a great job at exploring different theoretical societies populated by aliens that took completely a completely different evolutionary track than our own.
  • Thinking Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman - This centers all of my thinking on economics and life generally. Punchline: humans are terrible at statistical thinking.
  • Bullshizzle Jobs: A Theory by David Graeber - Dives into who so many of the office jobs we have feel like a performative waste of time.
  • Atomic Habits by James Clear - I usually hate self-help books, or anything of the sort, but Clear breaks things down succinctly and "cuts through" a lot of the mental garbage. There's no messing around here, but it's on the reader to be willing to engage in true self reflection

 

I could go on and on. I love books man.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love reading too and I'm particularly fascinated by actual physical books. The way they feel, smell, which I guess contributes to the experience and how much I enjoy reading.
I'm not particularly a huge fan of fiction bar a few exceptions like LoTR or GoT. I just find it hard to get into anything else, but provided I get a good taste of the contents of these books before attempting to read them (ex - I read LoTR after watching the first movie; I got into GoT after the first season) then I get hooked and end up enjoying the whole set.
A few like Eragon or the Mists of Avalon I got into because they were gifts from family or friends, but they're a rarity as for the most part I prefer real history to fantasy.

Which brings me to my absolute favorite type of books: History books. I read anything that pertains to historical events, civilizations, advances etc for as long as it predates the concept of modern days. Mostly anything WW2 and below will attract me, whereas past the 40s it stops feeling as interesting to me. I don't know why, just personal taste.
I've read about everything I can get my hands on from authors like Mary Beard or Adrian Goldsworthy, but also the likes of Martyn Rady, Katja Hoyder, Neil Gaiman (this one is a bit more of fictional history - his books I've read are his interpretations of religious myths such as the Norse Pantheon myths. Qualifies as mythology I suppose.) and countless other 'minor' writers with very specific areas of expertise such as Inazo Nitobe and his 'Bushido'.

Currently reading 'The Fall of Carthage' (Punic Wars), after which I will finish (been on hold for a few months in the last chapters) 'Blood and Iron' (History of Germany).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Micael Fatia said:

I love reading too and I'm particularly fascinated by actual physical books. The way they feel, smell, which I guess contributes to the experience and how much I enjoy reading.

I agree completely. I used a Kindle for a bit for the convenience and the legitimately great backlight. But I've moved back to either buying all of my books or, more often, requesting books through the local library network.

What are three books you'd recommend to anyone who is a fan of reading generally?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love the classics, notably The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas. Strangely enough, without knowing the author was Alexandre Dumas, I read and enjoyed The Man In The Iron Mask and The Three Musketeers. My other most cherished book is The Complete Sherlock Holmes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Never judge a book by its cover unless it's these Barnes and Noble covers with gilded edge paper.

qggaVtn.jpg sGVNc1w.jpg

 

As of late, I haven't done a lot of reading. The last books I read were:

Midnight Sun - Stephanie Meyer

Gvbp0su.jpg

Her writing has improved, and it was interesting to revisit forks from another perspective. Was it okay to retell the story of twilight from the perspective of the Cullens? I'm not sure it would have been worth it for a die-hard fan of the series, but as someone who largely forgot about it all and didn't get suckered into Life and Death: Twilight Reimagined, it was a positive experience.

 

12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos - Jordan B Peterson

PURYAjH.jpg

Jordan Peterson remains, in my mind at least, one of the wisest men on the planet. I find it easier to watch his videos than to read his books. This book is the kind that you stop and go, "huh, yeah, I never really thought about it like that," You get these incredible moments of clarity as you relate situations from your life to the book. Part of the reason I'm pretty fond of this book is that I like to analyse my life and what other people are doing. Suffering from depression, this was something to anchor to and learn with.

 

The Binding by Bridget Collins

XP1tjSZ.jpg

It shows that you can pick a book off the shelf at a supermarket and still enjoy it. Usually, when I've tried doing that in the past, all you can find is biographies and bizarre fiction. I read about magic, bookbinding and romance in this case, and my curiosity peaked. Emmett is an apprentice bookbinder. Bookbinders can add your name to a book with specific memories and make the memories vanish. Emmett finds a book with his name on it. I read this in one sitting and even cried.

 

My Life as a White Trash Zombie - Diane Rowland

hEc70gb.jpg

I read this entire series because I wanted some trashy fantasy fiction, and it did not disappoint my cravings. This girl dies and gets a job at the parish morgue. She's got a massive crush on a police officer and wants to eat people a lot. It's so dumb, but as a mystery series, just reading these characters and their interactions put a smile on my face. Plus, the author has worked many jobs in this series, bartender, a blackjack dealer, a pit boss, a street cop, a detective, a computer forensics specialist, a crime scene investigator, a crime scene investigator and a morgue assistant.

The moral of this post is that I need to read better books and probably get out of the young adult fantasy 2009 phase I seem to be in.

On 7/10/2022 at 3:04 AM, Adam? said:
  • Atomic Habits by James Clear - I usually hate self-help books, or anything of the sort, but Clear breaks things down succinctly and "cuts through" a lot of the mental garbage. There's no messing around here, but it's on the reader to be willing to engage in true self reflection

My last purchase was Atomic Habits as an audiobook! I need to listen to it!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/12/2022 at 5:42 PM, Adam? said:

I agree completely. I used a Kindle for a bit for the convenience and the legitimately great backlight. But I've moved back to either buying all of my books or, more often, requesting books through the local library network.

What are three books you'd recommend to anyone who is a fan of reading generally?

That's a very tough one. I'm sure many of my favorites are well know books that most of you will have read by now, so it seems pointless to mention them. But if I don't, it leaves out very few if any books that aren't history books, and these tend not to be everyone's cup of tea.
Taking the risk of making some boring choices, I would personally recommend SPQR - my favorite book about Rome, written by Cambridge's Classic's teacher Mary Beard; two books by Dan Jones: The Templars: The Rise and Spectacular Fall of God's Holy Warriors; and Crusaders: An Epic History of the Wars for the Holy Lands. I am by no means a religious person, much the opposite given my historical knowledge and experience in historical subjects, but the Templars and the Crusades are ever always a fascinating subject. Finally, not historical books but they're books I quite enjoyed. By no means award winning books or even books a lot of people have heard about, my love for them is surely augmented by how much I am a fan of the franchise but... Lord of Souls and the Infernal City (two separate books, not the same title) by Greg Keyes. Small, simple books that tell a tale between TES IV: Oblivion and TES V: Skyrim.
I found them quick and satisfying reads.
Anything else coming to mind right now is surely either too boring (if you don't like the same types of books as me) or something everyone has read.

Thank you for asking. What would you recommend yourself?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/31/2022 at 3:25 PM, King Mic said:

That's a very tough one. I'm sure many of my favorites are well know books that most of you will have read by now, so it seems pointless to mention them. But if I don't, it leaves out very few if any books that aren't history books, and these tend not to be everyone's cup of tea.

History is one of the genres I want to read more of. There's just an overwhelming amount to choose from! I'll be sure to look at some of your recs, particular regarding the templars and crusades since I know basically nothing about them.

 

On 7/31/2022 at 3:25 PM, King Mic said:


Thank you for asking. What would you recommend yourself?

 

My post a few posts up is a pretty solid list of some of my favorite fiction and non-fiction books. Let me know if you're after anything from a particular genre.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Guidelines and Privacy Policy.