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Tree

Donorship - "Yes, unless"

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If the draft bill goes on to become law, everyone in the Netherlands will be considered a donor unless they specifically request to be taken off the list.

D66 hopes that by establishing an opt-out register, more organs will become available for transplant. ‘This is great news for everyone on the waiting list,’ Dijkstra said after the vote. ‘Every year, 150 people die who could have been alive with a donor organ.’

(Source: http://www.dutchnews.nl/news/archives/2016/09/dutch-mps-vote-for-yes-unless-organ-donation-register/)

 

Your thoughts?

Personally, I find this law is a near neo-communistic deliberate devaluation of the individual will in favor of 'collective' wellbeing. A radical utilitarian approach (doing the most good for the maximum amount of people) even if this means violating some (minor? less important?) ethics along the way. Let me elaborate:

This law means that anyone is automatically assumed to be available for donorship - unless you manually opt out. This means that all young adults, most of which are not very mentally occupied with the concept of death just yet (and therefore likely not to have opted 'in' or 'out), will be part of this group.

This means that, in theory, an 18-year old who gets in a motorcycle accident will have his/her organs transplanted. Any wishes the parents or siblings may have about this are deemed irrelevant.

What do you think? May it be worth to disregard this in favor of saving a life? Should donorship always be voluntary? What is the main 'source' of all these newly-required life-saving organs?

Edited by Tree
Fixed the quote.

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I agree with your opinions. Rights of the individual, even the dead individual, must be recognized. Involuntarily taking away organs from a person is a huge overreach. Sure, they don't need them anymore, but can the government take anything somebody doesn't need anymore?

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This is one of those bills that sounds like a great idea and is kind of hard to argue against because if you oppose it people will say "but they're dead, do you not care about keeping people alive? You're sick!!"

In reality, the government should be no means have this much control over your body. The government already seems to stick their hands in everything else (and it usually gets mucked up/filled with corruption as part of the process) so why allow them to dictate the terms of your passing as well? Granted, I have not a single morsel of knowledge about Netherlands politics, but the belief applies to any government. Less control and oversight is better. You shouldn't be changing laws to legally take peoples' organs. 

Yes, you would save more lives. So instead of making a law, how about put monies towards popularizing donor status? Run campaigns to show their usefulness. Just don't resort to making a law to force people to do something that might be out of their beliefs/interests. 

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The bill fouses on catching people out and hoping people just don't opt out so there is more organs to help save lives.

It's the wrong approach. As difficult as it is to find the right match for a donated organ and as long as the list is doesn't mean you should just adjust your tactic to catch people out.

If you want to do it properly you make people more aware that they can opt in. Perhaps you remind people every couple of years. Better still, inform people of the good they will be doing, reassure them.

Better than that in places like the US, offer them a tax relief or something as a thank-you for being kind enough to offer their body up. Or you know, give them money off their medical bills. Or help with their insurance. No idea how it works in the netherlands.

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In the USA, you check yes or no to become an organ donor.  That's a pretty easy and fair way to get the donor's consent.  This seems kind of sleazy when you start to think about it for more than 2 seconds.

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